Biographies of the New American Nation: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Frederick Douglass, and More (Impact on America: Collective Biographies)

Biographies of the New American Nation: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Frederick Douglass, and More (Impact on America: Collective Biographies)

Language: English

Pages: 146

ISBN: 1615306862

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


A captivating series that surveys the lives of the political figures and social revolutionaries who shaped early U.S. history includes vibrant images depicting memorable events and individuals, a glossary, explanations of key terms and ideas, and relevant
Title: Biographies of the New American Nation
Author: Hollar, Sherman (EDT)
Publisher: Rosen Pub Group
Publication Date: 2012/08/10
Number of Pages: 146
Binding Type: LIBRARY
Library of Congress: 2011045403

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outlined a forward-thinking agenda for his presidency. He supported the gradual development of Western territories, and petitioned Congress for federal aid to build more roads and canals. To strengthen higher education and stimulate science, he proposed creating a national university, a naval academy, and national astronomical observatories. However, the Jacksonians in Congress rejected his plans. Lithograph of a daguerreotype image of the sixth U.S. president—and son of the second

presidency. Clay was the author of the famous saying, “I would rather be right than be president.” Clay was born on April 12, 1777, in Hanover County, Va. Encouraged by his stepfather, Clay studied law under the prominent professor George Wythe, and was admitted to the Virginia bar when he was 20. Shortly afterward he moved to Kentucky. There his great leadership and eloquence soon won for him a place in the Kentucky legislature. Two years later, in 1806, Clay was chosen to fill an unexpired

presidency. Clay was the author of the famous saying, “I would rather be right than be president.” Clay was born on April 12, 1777, in Hanover County, Va. Encouraged by his stepfather, Clay studied law under the prominent professor George Wythe, and was admitted to the Virginia bar when he was 20. Shortly afterward he moved to Kentucky. There his great leadership and eloquence soon won for him a place in the Kentucky legislature. Two years later, in 1806, Clay was chosen to fill an unexpired

his time was taken up by editorial work. He gradually acquired a half interest in the paper. At first he stood with the Democrats on national affairs. Finally he broke with them on the slavery issue. When the Republican Party was formed in 1856 he rallied the paper to its cause. Bryant died in New York City on June 12, 1878. CHAPTER 26 NAT TURNER The most effective slave revolt in U.S. history was led by a young black man, Nat Turner, who regarded himself as an agent of God to lead his

land surveyor, and Jane Randolph, who was descended from one of the most prominent families in Virginia. Jefferson studied at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va., and gained admittance to the Virginia bar in April 1767. He returned to Shadwell in 1768 and designed his own home on an 867-foot (264-meter) mountain near Shadwell. He named his new estate Monticello, an Italian word meaning “little mountain.” He married Martha Wayles Skelton on New Year’s Day in 1772. The couple had

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