Secret Lives of the U.S. Presidents: What Your Teachers Never Told you About the Men of The White House

Secret Lives of the U.S. Presidents: What Your Teachers Never Told you About the Men of The White House

Language: English

Pages: 0

ISBN: B00F9WQTOA

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Your high school history teachers never gave you a book like this one! Secret Lives of the U.S. Presidents features outrageous and uncensored profiles of the men in the White House - complete with hundreds of little-known, politically incorrect, and downright wacko facts. You'll discover that:

  • George Washington spent a whopping 7% of his salary on booze
  • John Quincy Adams loved to skinny-dip in the Potomac River
  • Gerald Ford once worked as a Cosmopolitan magazine cover model
  • Warren G. Harding gambled with White House china when he ran low on cash
  • Jimmy Carter reported a UFO sighting in Georgia
  • And Richard Nixon . . . sheesh, don't get us started on Nixon!

With chapters on everyone from George Washington to Barack Obama, Secret Lives of the U.S. Presidents tackles all the tough questions that other history books are afraid to ask: How many of these guys were cheating on their wives? Are there really secret tunnels underneath the White House? And what was Nancy Reagan thinking when she appeared on Diff'rent Strokes? American history was never this much fun in school!

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as a boy. When Jesse insisted that his son leave Ohio to make something of himself at West Point, young Useless wanted nothing to do with it. Jesse insisted, and Grant went. Though he proved an unremarkable student who seemed utterly bored by all things military, he did win awards for his equestrian skills. He went on to serve with distinction in the Mexican War (to which he was morally opposed) and then suffered through a string of monotonous postings on the northwestern frontier that drove him

to drink. Grant’s name is often associated with the mass slaughters of the Civil War, but the mere sight of blood nauseated him. And drink. And drink some more. Even in a frontier military whose officer corps was known for its reliance on inebriation, Grant’s boozing began to turn some high-ranking heads, and he was forced to resign. Glad to be reunited with his wife and children, he tried to provide for them and fell flat on his face. He had no business sense whatsoever and eventually found

animals and glorified the actions of the Ku Klux Klan. “It’s like writing history with lightning,” Wilson said about the racist epic, “and my only regret is that it is all so terribly true.” He didn’t like women voters, either. He was slow to come around to the suffrage movement, whose picketers once converged on the White House and turned down the president’s invitation to come in for tea. First Lady Edith was no fan of suffragettes, either; she called them “disgusting creatures.” Despite

the gift of a By 1968, Nixon had suffered losses in a run for president against Kennedy and a run for governor of California. It looked as if his political career was finished. Unfortunately for the rest of us, he made an astonishing comeback, recasting himself as a chastened, wiser Nixon. With lavish support from the old dubious sources, he squeezed out Humphrey to achieve the title he’d wanted for so long: president of the United States. Buried beneath the criminal activity that brought down

police—files that many have insisted could’ve indicted the Clintons for their Whitewater dealings. The Clintons were accused of fundraising violations that included taking money from lobbyists for the Chinese government and a scheme in which campaign donors were rewarded with “sleepovers” at the White House. Clinton couldn’t avoid scandal even after he left the White House. One of his final acts as president was to issue 140 pardons—some of which appeared to be in exchange for contributions to

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