Theatres of San Francisco (CA) (Images of America)

Theatres of San Francisco (CA) (Images of America)

Jack Tillmany

Language: English

Pages: 128

ISBN: 0738530204

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


You read the sad stories in the papers: another ornate, 1920s, single-screen theatre closes, to be demolished and replaced by a strip mall. That's progress, and in this 20-screen multiplex world, it's happening more and more. Only a handful of the 100 or so neighborhood theatres that once graced these streets are left in San Francisco, but they live on in the photographs featured in this book. The heyday of such venues as the Clay, Noe, Metro, New Mission, Alexandria, Coronet, Fox, Uptown, Coliseum, Surf, El Rey, and Royal was a time when San Franciscans thronged to the movies and vaudeville shows, dressed to the hilt, to see and be seen in majestic art deco palaces. Unfortunately, this era has passed into history despite the dedicated efforts of many neighborhood preservation groups.

Clover Adams: A Gilded and Heartbreaking Life

The Hawk and the Dove: Paul Nitze, George Kennan, and the History of the Cold War

Moon Spotlight: Savannah & the Georgia Coast

Hidden History of North Alabama

History of the United States Capitol: A Chronicle of Design, Construction, and Politics

Red River Floods: Fargo and Moorhead (Images of America)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

second-run and sub-run houses—once catered to the tastes of San Francisco’s sprawling Mission district. Every one of them are gone now except for two of the oldest, the Roxie and the Victoria on Sixteenth Street, two survivors by every definition of the word. This 1932 view of Mission Street, looking north from Twenty-second Street, shows the New Mission on the left, with its comparatively small original vertical sign, and the Rialto (formerly Wigwam, later Crown and Cine Latino) on the right.

and California intersection. Like so many others, it received a complete renovation and art deco facade in the mid-1930s, and this is the way it is remembered today, limited in its extravagance by its narrow 25-foot Polk Street frontage. It closed February 22, 1998, and was eventually torn down. The subdued moderne interior of the Royal as it looked from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s is shown here. Like the Alhambra, its narrow stage could not adequately offer worthwhile widescreen

and California intersection. Like so many others, it received a complete renovation and art deco facade in the mid-1930s, and this is the way it is remembered today, limited in its extravagance by its narrow 25-foot Polk Street frontage. It closed February 22, 1998, and was eventually torn down. The subdued moderne interior of the Royal as it looked from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s is shown here. Like the Alhambra, its narrow stage could not adequately offer worthwhile widescreen

ended in the 1960s, after which time it was taken over by the Lamplighters as the home of their Gilbert and Sullivan operettas. When the Lamplighters moved on to Presentation Theatre at 2350 Turk Street, the Harding served as a church for many years but now stands vacant and will most likely be torn down. The Victory Theatre at 2030 Sutter Street opened on November 25, 1907. It was one of a cluster of post-earthquake Fillmore district venues. Two years later it was named Fischer’s but is

front, renamed the State, and reopened on New Years Eve 1941, but its luck failed to improve. Offering revivals, often of films that really didn’t deserve to be revived, extended second-runs from the Paramount, and occasional first-runs of poor-quality films, it finally shut down in March 1954. For the next few years it stood vacant, only occasionally dusting off the seats for religious services. Poignantly, the marquee was used to promote whatever was showing at the St. Francis up the street. In

Download sample

Download